How Skimm’ing is Changing the Ways we get the News

As an International Relations and Economics double major I pride myself for knowing what’s going on in the world outside the Tufts bubble. As a college student, however, it’s easy to get bogged down with the college lifestyle and feel out of touch.

So, when I heard about theSkimm, I was interested. theSkimm is a free daily newsletter that provides a concise summary of current events and news stories. Currently, it has over half a million subscribers with its customer base rapidly growing. Snappy headlines with pop culture references such as “bye Felicia” and “pick me, choose me, love me” attract a key demographic: busy, educated millennials in the work force.

I heard about theSkimm from one of my friends who happened to be interning at their Boston office over the summer. I liked the idea of a free daily newsletter summarizing that day’s news stories, and decided to subscribe. Before I knew it, I was checking theSkimm every morning. I, like many other customers, was drawn in by its readability and its apparent lack of media bias.

This being said, I’m not 100% ready to call myself a Skimm’er. As the world saw a major transition from print to digital journalism, there was a major change in the way people receive the news. Although it is still very much in its early stage, theSkimm raises questions about the future of digital journalism. With this convenient resource, will people still look to news sites for their daily fix of current events? Will people be less likely to delve into certain worldly issues, and lead to a less informed voting base? Or will a consolidation of the news and an increase in accessibility lead to a more informed public?

Shivani Shendye, A17